Here is the syllabus for the UAF AFLA one-credit, pass/fail class offered by Sabine Siekmann at Glacier View School October 1-3.





Here is the syllabus (minus the UAA policy parts) for the Fall 2010 TPRS class.

Course Calendar/Schedule:

Advance reading: Carol Gaab: “Starting a New School Year.” Optional: O’Connor.
Please bring a text with you that you might use in any level class. (a page will be enough)

Session 1, Saturday August 14 Setting the scene
Course overview: schedule, assignments, collaboration options.
Assessment and Standards-based grading (Scott Benedict)
Forms of assessment for TPRS
Formative versus summative assessments
Managing assessment variety: nuts and bolts
Setting up Zangle for Standards-based grading (Helen Hsieh)
Classroom Management
Backward planning: Three steps of TPRS (Michele Whaley)
What to tell students; planning a story for parent night
Coaching practice

Reading: Anne Matava and Laurie Clarcq on skeleton stories and embedded readings
Assignment: complete your lesson plan

Session 2, Friday, Aug. 27
Conference reports (?Gellert, Dahl, Whaley, Cordero, O’Brien-Holen)
On-line sources: yahoo group, Ben Slavic, moretprs.com, Ning
Discuss assignment; Susie’s 25-word plan
Coaching practice

Reading: Essential Topics, moretprs.com; Rubrics: Sanchez, Gross, Benedict
Assignment: sketch out a rubric for writing or speaking

Session 3, Friday, Sep. 10
Extending a story
Retells
Perspective changes
Writing: dictant, fast-write, class write
Quiz forms: vocab, structure, T/F
Embellishing
Repeating vocabulary in every story

Rubric review (bring three copies of one rubric)
Coaching reading practice


Follow-up: October AFLA conference, November First Friday, December First Friday.

Assignments: post a lesson plan, collaboration log, a rubric, and a reflection. (Due Dec. 2)



Related Professional Organizations:
Alaskans for Language Acquisition
American Council on theTeaching of Foreign LanguagesCourse Texts and Readings:
Note: Articles are available on line. Course texts are available through Amazon.com and through BenSlavic.com or through school world language departments.



Highly Recommended Texts—you will want these in your personal library.

Matava, Anne (2009): Story Scripts Volume 1. Slavic Press: Colorado.

O'Connor, K. (2009). How to Grade for Learning: Linking Grades to Standards (3rd ed.). Corwin Press: California.

Ray, Blaine and Seely, Contee, Fifth Edition (2008). Fluency Through TPRStorytelling, Command Performance Language Institute, California.

Slavic, Ben (2001). TPRS in a Year. Slavic Press: Colorado.

Slavic, Ben (2008). PQA in a Wink. Slavic Press: Colorado.


Great Reads:

Benedict, S. (n.d.). Proficiency-based Grading [PowerPoint ]. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from
http://www.teachforjune.com/workshops/

Clarcq, L. (n.d.) An Embedded Story in the Making [On-line Article]. Retrieved May 22, 2010, from http://blog.heartsforteaching.com/2010/02/27/an-embedded-story-in-the-making.aspx

Fritze, J. (n.d.). Reading Resources for World Language. In Comprehensible Input Methods. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from http://homepage.mac.com/jasonfritze/Menu1.html

Gaab, C. (n.d.). Level 1-Cuentame Mas/Raconte-moi Encore [Data file]. Retrieved June 20, 2009, from http://www.tprstorytelling.com/index.php?option=com_docman&Itemid=61 Level one books by Carol Gaab. Download and read the first chapters, even if French and Spanish are not your languages, to better understand the lesson plans.

Gaab, C. (n.d.). Starting a New School Year: 2-week lesson [Data file]. Retrieved June 20, 2009, from tprstorytelling.com Web site: http://www.tprstorytelling.com/ index.php?option=com_docman&Itemid=61

Gross, S. (n.d.). Back to School Night [Handout]. Retrieved May 22, 2010, from http://www.susangrosstprs.com/docs/index.html

Gross, S. (n.d.). Brain-Based Teaching [Article]. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from
http://www.susangrosstprs.com/docs/index.html

Gross, S. (n.d.). The Natural Order of Acquisition [Article]. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from
http://www.susangrosstprs.com/docs/index.html

Gross, S. (2009, April). Reading is Essential in Second Language Classes [Article]. Retrieved May 24, 2009, from http://www.susangrosstprs.com/docs/index.html

Gross, S. (n.d.). Writing Assessment Rubrics and Oral Assessment Rubrics [Handouts]. Retrieved May 22, 2010 from http://www.susangrosstprs.com/lessons/index.html

Placido, K. (n.d.). Language Learning. Retrieved from https://www.msu.edu/~sandinkr/langlearn.htm

Sanchez, C. (n.d.). Effective Use of TPRS in Upper-Level Courses [Article]. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from http://www.tprstories.com/ntprs/2004/handouts/vegas2004_andrews-sanchez_eff_use_TPRS_upper_levels.pdf





Here is the syllabus for the 2009/2010 Comprehensible Input class.

It is variable credit: two or three credits.


Quick links:
Course Calendar
Course Texts and Readings
Course Assignment Outline

(And please forgive me--as of August, the schedule is changing because of Blaine's visit--everything got thrown off--but we'll eventually get to all the pieces.)

University of Alaska Anchorage
College of Education
3211 Providence Drive
Anchorage, Alaska 99508-8269

Personalizing Comprehensible Input

2or 3 Credits, Graded A-F
Two credits: $164; three credits: $184

Fall –Spring 2009-2010

Course Sponsor: West High World Languages

Primary Instructor: Michele Whaley

Contact Information
Address: West High School
1700 Hillcrest Drive
Anchorage, AK 99517


Telephone: 907.742-2500
FAX: 907.742-5200

Email address: whaley_michele@asdk12.org

Course Meeting Information
Location: West High Relo #5

Start and End Date: August 15, 2009 to April 2, 2010

Class Day(s) & Time(s): One Saturday from 12-4, followed by Fridays (Saturday August 15, Fridays August 28, November 6, December 4, January 8, February 5, April 2 from 3:30-6:00 pm). An additional 15 hours is required for two credits, or an additional 30 hours for three credits. Participants can choose a mixture of collaboration in small groups (participants will schedule those hours with their group members) and attendance at TPRS language classes that will be offered by outside presenters to fulfill those hours. Participants should make certain that they will be able to attend the additional classes before making the choice to sign up for three credits.

Final Paper Due: April 2, 2010

Course Description: This course explores ways to personalize comprehensible input in the world language classroom. It will include how to set up routines for classroom management, reading, discussions, and writing at the beginning of the year, as well as the means of addressing benchmark vocabulary and structures. We will address formal and informal methods of assessment, as well as teaching in upper levels and AP/IB classes. Participants will learn how to use standards-based grading as they implement a quality literacy program. Students will use technology as teaching and learning tools.

Intended Audience: World Language teachers

Course Design:
a. Requires 15 contact hours with the class group, 15 small group hours, and an average of approximately 60 hours of engaged learning outside of class for two credits. For three credits, the course requires participants to attend at least one series of language classes taught by outside presenters and approximately 90 total hours of engaged learning outside class.
b. Does not apply to any UAA certificate or degree program.
c. No UAA lab and/or materials fees beyond standard charges.
d. This course is based upon the collegial sharing, collaboration, and support of the participants and facilitator as a community of learners. Course activities will include common readings and group discussions, collective learning processes, peer coaching/mentoring, and reflective practices.


Instructional Goals and Defined Outcomes:

RESEARCH BASED THEORY/PRINCIPLES/PRACTICES/TRENDS (CONTENT)

1.0 Instructional Goal:
Introduce the research-based principles of the comprehensible input methods as well as of accelerated language learning methodology.

Defined Outcome:
Participants will examine key elements of comprehensible input methods.


THEORY INTO PRACTICE (APPLICATION)

2.0 Instructional Goal:
Provide a collaborative structure for participants to translate the essential principles and components of Comprehensible Input into their classroom practices.

Defined Outcome:
Participants will examine the strengths and potential problems of the strategies supporting the three steps of TPRStorytelling as defined by Susan Gross, Blaine Ray, Carol Gaab and Ben Slavic as they implement the methodology.

REFLECTION ON THEORY INTO PRACTICE (REFLECTION)

3.0 Instructional Goal:
Engage participants in “in-action” and “on-action” reflective examinations of the theories, their implemented practices, and the outcomes.

Defined Outcome:
Participants will analyze and reflect upon the principles and strategies presented during the classes and in the readings, their application in the classroom, the outcomes of the implementation, and the implication for future direction in the classroom, as well as professional learning needs.

RELATIONSHIP TO STANDARDS

4.0 Instructional Goal:
Familiarize participants with the district, state, and national standards addressed by the strategies and concepts presented.

Defined Outcome:
Participants will identify the standards met by implementing the strategies for using comprehensible input methods.


Writing Style Requirements:
Participants’ writing will reflect the clarity, conciseness, and creativity expected of post-baccalaureate certificated educators.

Attendance and Make-up Policy:
Participants are expected to actively and collegially participate in all classes as a contributing member of a learning community. Attendance at every session is, therefore, very important and make-up for missed classes will be approved by the instructor on an exception basis only.

Course Assignments, Assessment of Learning, and Grading System:
Where there are two choices of hours or forum contributions, the lower is for two credits, and the higher number is for three credits.

Course grading will be A-F based upon the following. Rubrics will be provided for each assignment.

a. Participation and Collegial Support 25%
Participants will be expected to actively and collegially participate in discussions, activities, and other process experiences during the seminars and group sessions. Participants will contribute questions and responses to on-line forums on comprehensible input five times or ten times for 3 credits over the course of the class (one completed contribution due by meetings in November, December, January, February and April).

b. Reflective Paper 25%
Participants will complete a thoughtful, reflection of course experience(s), discussions, applications, and readings (due April 2).

c. Small Group/Teacher Observation Participation 25%
Participants will participate, log, and report on collaboration with other world language teachers or observation of visiting teachers as they implement comprehensible input methods. Logs will include the date, time, participant or teacher names, and description and reflection on activities.

d. Application and Assessment 25%
Participants will apply the strategies in their classroom and will submit an assessment of the process and outcomes. Three implementation reports will be due at the November, January, and April meetings.


Quality of Work
Assignments, projects, papers, presentations, etc. will be graded for quality as follows:

“A” work goes beyond the assignment in originality, scholarship or critical thinking; excellent in all aspects.

“B” work is complete, comprehensive, and well prepared; clearly indicates that considerable time and intellectual effort was expended in preparing the assignment.

“C” work is average; completed as requested, on time, and in appropriate format.

“D” work is below average; incomplete or chronically late; in inappropriate format; does not meet course standards, shows limited effort and understanding.

“F” indicates that the student has not met the guidelines for “A-D” work.


Course Calendar/Schedule: (includes dates for topics, readings, assignments)

Pre-course reading assignment: Blaine Ray, chapters 1-2; Benedict presentation (on his site); Ben Slavic, TPRS pp 1-12, PQA pp 1-12; Carol Gaab: “Starting a New School Year.” Optional: O’Connor.
Session 1, Saturday August 15 Setting the scene
Assessment and Standards-based grading (Scott Benedict) and Lesson Planning (Piedad Gutierrez)
o Standards-based grading and Zangle overview
• Rationale/research for Standards-based grading
• The no-zero movement
• Setting up the grade book
o Daily quizzes: including vocabulary, structure, listening, and culture
o Forms of oral assessment
o Formative versus summative assessments
o Coaching
o Readings for next session: Ray, chapters 3-4, Slavic as discussed.

What we really did: Circling with Pictures, Scott Benedict
See Scott's site, teachforJune.com to download the powerpoint
Units around circles, topics and benchmark vocabulary
Methods of implementing
How to stay in the language from day 1
Assessment techniques

Piedad Gutierrez: Planning TPRS lessons; using play in the classroom

We'll ask Scott to come back to do his assessment workshop with us.

Session 2, Friday, Aug. 28
Blaine Ray was here to do the Spanish workshop. He talked with us before the workshop on Friday. Helen posted notes on the ning.
o Reading for next session: Susan Gross and Jason Fritze articles; Ray chapters 5-8

Session 3, Friday, Nov. 6

Consolidation: what did you take from Scott? What did you take from Blaine? And Piedad?
Coaching as the answer to many questions
Possible Reading topics:
o Daily group reading
o Group novels
o Homework
o Free Voluntary Reading
o Due: Implementation Report #1, Forum contribution #1/1-2, 5/10-hour collaboration log
o Reading for next meeting Ray 9-10


Session 4, Friday, Dec. 4 Literacy (Susie Gross)
o Three ways to use reading in the classroom
o Using partners
o Assessment on the spot
o Coaching
o Readings for next session: Ray chapter 11-12, Slavic
o Due: Forum Contribution #2/3-4

Session 5, Friday, Jan. 8 Assessment
o Zangle fixes
o How to grade for learning
o Formative/summative assessment
ACTFL Guidelines
o Matching the goals of TPRStorytelling with ACTFL and state standards

o Coaching
o Readings for next session: Carmen Sanchez; Ray 13-14
o Due: Implementation Report #2, Forum contribution #3/5-6


Session 6, Friday, Feb. 5 Upper levels (Carmen Sanchez need to confirm)
o Varying the questioning
o Discreet grammar
o Varying points of view
o Aspects of Interpreter Training (Terry Thatcher Waltz need to confirm)
o Due: Forum contribution #4/7-8, 5/10-hour collaboration log


Session 7, Friday, April 2 Sharing results
o Group presentations on collaboration
o Reflection on class outcomes
o Due: Implementation Report #3, Forum contribution #5/9-10, Final paper: includes the final five/ten-hour log of collaboration and reflective paper covering the entire course.


Related Professional Organizations:
Alaskans for Language Acquisition
American Council on theTeaching of Foreign Languages



Course Texts and Readings:
Note: Articles are available on line. Course texts are available through Amazon.com and through BenSlavic.com or through school world language departments.

Required Text/Materials:

Benedict, S. (n.d.). Proficiency-based Grading [PowerPoint ]. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from
http://www.teachforjune.com/workshops/

Fritze, J. (n.d.). Reading Resources for World Language. In Comprehensible Input Methods. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from http://homepage.mac.com/jasonfritze/Menu1.html

Gaab, C. (n.d.). Level 1-Cuentame Mas/Raconte-moi Encore [Data file]. Retrieved June 20, 2009, from http://www.tprstorytelling.com/index.php?option=com_docman&Itemid=61 Level one books by Carol Gaab. Download and read the first chapters, even if French and Spanish are not your languages, to better understand the lesson plans.

Gaab, C. (n.d.). Starting a New School Year: 2-week lesson [Data file]. Retrieved June 20, 2009, from tprstorytelling.com Web site: http://www.tprstorytelling.com/ index.php?option=com_docman&Itemid=61

Gross, S. (n.d.). Brain-Based Teaching [Article]. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from
http://www.susangrosstprs.com/docs/index.html

Gross, S. (n.d.). The Natural Order of Acquisition [Article]. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from
http://www.susangrosstprs.com/docs/index.html

Gross, S. (2009, April). Reading is Essential in Second Language Classes [Article]. Retrieved May 24, 2009, from http://www.susangrosstprs.com/docs/index.html

Placido, K. (n.d.). Language Learning. Retrieved from https://www.msu.edu/~sandinkr/langlearn.htm

Ray, Blaine and Seely, Contee, Fifth Edition (2008). Fluency Through TPRStorytelling, Command Performance Language Institute, California.

Sanchez, C. (n.d.). Effective Use of TPRS in Upper-Level Courses [Article]. Retrieved May 23, 2009, from http://www.tprstories.com/ntprs/2004/handouts/vegas2004_andrews-sanchez_eff_use_TPRS_upper_levels.pdf

Slavic, Ben (2001). TPRS in a Year. (2008). Slavic Press: Colorado.

Slavic, Ben (2008). PQA in a Wink. (2008). Slavic Press: Colorado.


Content References:

8th Annual National TPRS Conference [Handouts ]. (n.d.). Retrieved May 24, 2009, from Fluency Fast Web site: http://www.tprstories.com/ntprs/2008/handouts-08.htm

The International Journal of Foreign Language Teaching [On-line quarterly journal registration]. (n.d.). May 24, 2009, from Fluency Fast Web site: http://www.tprstories.com/ijflt/

Krashen, S. (1993). The effect of formal grammar study: Still peripheral. TESOL Quarterly 27: 722-725.

Krashen, S. (2005). Free Voluntary reading: New Research, Applications, and
Controversies. In G. Poedjosoedarmo, (Ed.) Innovative Approaches to Reading &
Writing Instruction. Republic of Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre,
Anthology Series 46, pp. 1-9.

Krashen, S. (1998). Foreign Language Education the Easy Way. Language Education Associates: California.

Krashen, S. (2004). The Power of Reading: Insights into the Research, 2nd edition.
Heinemann/Libraries Unlimited. (p. 37)

Krashen, Stephen D. (1981). Principles and Practice in Second Language Acquisition. English Language Teaching series. Prentice-Hall International: London.

Krashen, Stephen D. (1988). Second Language Acquisition and Second Language Learning. Prentice-Hall International: London.

Krashen, S. (1998). Teaching Grammar: Why Bother?. California English Project

O'Connor, K. (2009). How to Grade for Learning: Linking Grades to Standards (3rd ed.). Corwin Press: California.

Sanders, K. B. (2001). ACTFL proficiency guidelines: Writing. Yonkers, NY: The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Sanders, K. B. (1999). ACTFL proficiency guidelines: Speaking. Yonkers, NY: The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.
Sousa, D. (2001). How the Brain Learns, 2nd Edition. Corwin Press, Inc.
Teaching Language in Context, 3rd Ed, Hadley, Alice Omaggio, Heinle & Heinle, 2002

Standards References:

Alaska Native Knowledge Network. (1998). Alaska standards for culturally responsive schools. Retrieved August 1, 2005, from http://www.ankn.uaf.edu/standards/standards.html.

American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages. (1996). Standards for foreign language learning: Preparing for the 21st century. Retrieved August 1, 2005, from http: //www.actfl.org.

State of Alaska Department of Education and Early Development. (1997). Standards for Alaska teachers. Juneau, AK: Author.

State of Alaska Department of Education and Early Development. (1995). Content standards for Alaska students: World Languages. Juneau, AK

Course Policies:

Incomplete Grades

Due to the nature of this course, grades of incomplete will not be permitted.

ADA Policy
The provision of equal opportunities for students who experience disabilities is a campus-wide responsibility and commitment. Disabilities Support Services (DSS) is the designated UAA department responsible for coordinating academic support services for students who experience disabilities. To access support services, students must contact DSS (786-4530 or 786-4536 TTY) and provide current disability documentation that supports the requested services. Disability support services are mandated by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. Additional information may be accessed at the DSS Office in Business Education Building (BEB105) or on-line at www.uaa.alaska.edu/dss.

Academic Dishonesty Policy
Academic integrity is a basic principle that requires all students to take credit only for the ideas and efforts that are their own. Cheating plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty are defined as the submission of materials in assignments, exams, or other academic work that is based on sources prohibited by the faculty member. Academic dishonesty is defined further in the “student Code of Conduct.” In addition to any adverse academic action that may result from the academically dishonest behavior, the University specifically reserves the right to address and sanction the conduct involved through student judicial review procedures and the Academic Dispute Resolution Procedure specified in the University catalog.

Professional and Ethical Behavior
University of Alaska Anchorage College of Education students are expected to abide by the State of Alaska Code of Ethics of the Education Profession and professional teaching standards as they concern students, the public, and the profession. The standards, adopted by the Professional Teaching Practices Commission, govern all members of the teaching profession. A violation of the code of ethics and professional teaching standards are grounds for revocation or suspension of teaching certification.

Technology Integration
University of Alaska Anchorage College of Education students are expected to (a) demonstrate sound understanding of technology operations and concepts; (b) plan and design effective learning environments and experiences supported by technology; (c) implement curriculum plans that include technology applications in methods and strategies to maximize student learning; (d) facilitate a variety of effective assessment and evaluation strategies; (e) use technology to enhance productivity and professional practice; and (f) understand the social, ethical, and human issues surrounding use of technology in PreK-12 schools and apply those principles in practice.

Course Assignment Outline
Choose this to download.